Free US Shipping On Orders Over $99
Free US Shipping On Orders Over$99
All content (video, audio, and .pdf files) copyright © Catholic Productions, LLC. All rights reserved. Click here for details.

The Third Sunday of Easter, Year B

Gospel, First Reading & Psalm


Second Reading


***Subscribe or Login for Full Access.***

GOSPEL, FIRST READING & PSALM TRANSCRIPT (Subscribe or Login for Full Transcript):

The Third Sunday of Easter for Year B takes us out of the Gospel of John and into the Gospel of Luke for one of the resurrection appearances of Christ. So if you recall from an earlier video, one of the things I pointed out is, that during the Easter season, although we’re in Year B, a lot of the readings are not going to be from Mark. Because, what they focus on are the resurrection appearances of Jesus and then on some of Jesus' teachings in the great Last Supper discourse from the Gospel of John. So if you go back, and if you have a copy of the Bible, and you want to look at the ending of Mark, you'll see that Mark gives us about eight verses that he dedicates to the discovery of the empty tomb on Sunday morning and that's it, in the shorter version of Mark's gospel. So the church goes elsewhere to get stories of Jesus' resurrection appearances during the Easter season. So this week we’re reading from the Gospel of Luke and we're reading the episode that follows the famous account of Jesus appearing to the disciples on the road to Emmaus. So we’re in Luke 24:35-48 and this is the Lord appearing to them and proving to them that he's actually risen from the dead and that he is not a ghost.  So that’s the story...

SECOND READING TRANSCRIPT (Subscribe or Login for Full Transcript):

And then he goes on to talk about the Paschal Mystery. He says:

...and he is the expiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. (1 John 2:2)

And what does this mean? He’s the “expiation.” That’s not a common word in English; we don’t use it a lot. It’s actually a difficult term in Greek to translate. The word is hilasmoshilasmos in Greek. It occurs only here in the New Testament, and so in order to understand it, you actually have to go back to the Greek Old Testament, known as the Septuagint. And this is another clue that John — the first letter of John — is either written for Jewish Christians or it’s written by a Jewish Christian author, thinking in Semitic ways, thinking in Jewish ways. Because the term hilasmos in the Jewish Scripture is the term used for the sacrifice of atonement that would be offered up to atone for the sins of the people.

Let me give you an example. In the book of Numbers 5:8, in the Greek translation, we read these words:

But if the man has no kinsman to whom restitution may be made for the wrong, the restitution for wrong shall go to the Lord for the priest, in addition to the ram of atonement...

...literally “the ram of hilasmos,” same Greek word...

...with which atonement is made for him.

So when John refers to Jesus as the hilasmos, He is the expiation for our sins. He’s literally saying, “He is the atonement” or “He is the sacrifice of atonement for our sins.” So he’s calling to mind there the very Jewish understanding of the Crucifixion as not just a Roman execution but as a sacrifice...and not just any kind of sacrifice, because you could offer sacrifices of thanksgiving. You could offer sacrifices of peace, peace offerings…fostering relationship and peace with God. But the sacrifice of atonement is one in which the blood is poured out in order to reconcile a sinner to God. That’s what atonement does. It’s actually one of the only theological terms that is an Anglo-Saxon root — at-one-ment, literally. Atonement is to be made at one with God. Most other theological terms are either Greek or Latin roots, so this is kind of an interesting English word. In any case, John here you could translate:

...and he is the [atonement] for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. (1 John 2:2)

So he’s trying to remind his readers that if they do sin, even though they’re in Christ, that they do have a method of redress...a method of reconciliation, which is Christ Himself, the atonement. However, he says:

And by this we may be sure that we know him, if we keep his commandments. He who says “I know him” but disobeys his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him; but whoever keeps his word, in him truly love for God is perfected. (1 John 2:3-5a)

So notice, as soon as John recognizes that someone may sin after coming to faith, and that there’s a method of atonement for that — which is Jesus Christ Himself and His intercession — he also wants to make sure that no one erroneously infers from the possibility of atonement that you're not bound to keep the commandments, that you’re free to break them. No, he says anyone who says he knows Christ but doesn’t keep His commandments is a liar, and the truth isn’t in him. But to those who love God and keep the commandments, the love of God is going to be perfected in them, brought to completion in them, brought to its fullness in them precisely through obedience.

So for John, it’s not like obedience is over here and love is over here. No, no, no. Obedience and love go together. That’s the way we express love for God...is through obedience to His commandments.

Alright, then one last thing about this that is very Jewish (I can’t help it) but very important — is the last line of that verse. It’s not in the lectionary, but I’m going to read it anyway. At the end of verse 5, it says:

By this we may be sure that we are in him: he who says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked. (1 John 2:5b-6)

What does that mean? Well, it doesn’t mean that you have to walk in the same way that Jesus walked literally, that your stride has to match Jesus. It’s a Jewish way of actually referring to the manner of life that you live. So in contemporary Catholic circles, if we talk about keeping the commandments, of vices and virtues, we’ll tend to call that moral theology. It’s about morality. How do we keep the mores of a particular culture or religion? Or we’ll call it ethics. What is the ethos of a particular culture, of a particular religion? And how do we abide by that ethos through the keeping, the practice of ethics?

But in ancient Judaism, they didn’t use either of those terms. They use the term called halakha. So the discussion of how you kept the law was called halakha. And halakha literally comes from the word (the verb) in Hebrew halak, which means to walk. So halakha, how you keep the law, is literally how you walk. It’s a very active image for the fact that in order to keep the commandments, we have to do it everyday. It’s like walking. It’s something that’s a constant process that lasts throughout our lives. So when he says we:

...ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.

It’s an image for the imitation of Christ in our moral life. So although we have an intercessor who atones for our sins, that doesn’t free us from the obligation of imitating the One who was without sin — namely, Jesus Christ.

So on this third Sunday of Easter, I think it’s actually significant that the Church is bringing before us the reminder both of the atoning sacrifice of Jesus that we celebrated at Easter during the Triduum, but also the implications of that sacrifice — namely, that we have to walk in the way that He walked and we have to keep the commandments of God.

So what I mean by that is — during the Easter season you’ll see this — the second readings that are chosen are often teaching us about certain truths of the faith but also about what life in Christ looks like. What does it mean to live in the power of the risen Jesus, to live as members of the Mystical Body of Christ in the new covenant age, in the new era after the Resurrection?

For full access subscribe here >

 

Gospel, First Reading & Psalm


Second Reading


***Subscribe or Login for Full Access.***

GOSPEL, FIRST READING & PSALM TRANSCRIPT (Subscribe or Login for Full Transcript):

The Third Sunday of Easter for Year B takes us out of the Gospel of John and into the Gospel of Luke for one of the resurrection appearances of Christ. So if you recall from an earlier video, one of the things I pointed out is, that during the Easter season, although we’re in Year B, a lot of the readings are not going to be from Mark. Because, what they focus on are the resurrection appearances of Jesus and then on some of Jesus' teachings in the great Last Supper discourse from the Gospel of John. So if you go back, and if you have a copy of the Bible, and you want to look at the ending of Mark, you'll see that Mark gives us about eight verses that he dedicates to the discovery of the empty tomb on Sunday morning and that's it, in the shorter version of Mark's gospel. So the church goes elsewhere to get stories of Jesus' resurrection appearances during the Easter season. So this week we’re reading from the Gospel of Luke and we're reading the episode that follows the famous account of Jesus appearing to the disciples on the road to Emmaus. So we’re in Luke 24:35-48 and this is the Lord appearing to them and proving to them that he's actually risen from the dead and that he is not a ghost.  So that’s the story...

SECOND READING TRANSCRIPT (Subscribe or Login for Full Transcript):

And then he goes on to talk about the Paschal Mystery. He says:

...and he is the expiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. (1 John 2:2)

And what does this mean? He’s the “expiation.” That’s not a common word in English; we don’t use it a lot. It’s actually a difficult term in Greek to translate. The word is hilasmoshilasmos in Greek. It occurs only here in the New Testament, and so in order to understand it, you actually have to go back to the Greek Old Testament, known as the Septuagint. And this is another clue that John — the first letter of John — is either written for Jewish Christians or it’s written by a Jewish Christian author, thinking in Semitic ways, thinking in Jewish ways. Because the term hilasmos in the Jewish Scripture is the term used for the sacrifice of atonement that would be offered up to atone for the sins of the people.

Let me give you an example. In the book of Numbers 5:8, in the Greek translation, we read these words:

But if the man has no kinsman to whom restitution may be made for the wrong, the restitution for wrong shall go to the Lord for the priest, in addition to the ram of atonement...

...literally “the ram of hilasmos,” same Greek word...

...with which atonement is made for him.

So when John refers to Jesus as the hilasmos, He is the expiation for our sins. He’s literally saying, “He is the atonement” or “He is the sacrifice of atonement for our sins.” So he’s calling to mind there the very Jewish understanding of the Crucifixion as not just a Roman execution but as a sacrifice...and not just any kind of sacrifice, because you could offer sacrifices of thanksgiving. You could offer sacrifices of peace, peace offerings…fostering relationship and peace with God. But the sacrifice of atonement is one in which the blood is poured out in order to reconcile a sinner to God. That’s what atonement does. It’s actually one of the only theological terms that is an Anglo-Saxon root — at-one-ment, literally. Atonement is to be made at one with God. Most other theological terms are either Greek or Latin roots, so this is kind of an interesting English word. In any case, John here you could translate:

...and he is the [atonement] for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the sins of the whole world. (1 John 2:2)

So he’s trying to remind his readers that if they do sin, even though they’re in Christ, that they do have a method of redress...a method of reconciliation, which is Christ Himself, the atonement. However, he says:

And by this we may be sure that we know him, if we keep his commandments. He who says “I know him” but disobeys his commandments is a liar, and the truth is not in him; but whoever keeps his word, in him truly love for God is perfected. (1 John 2:3-5a)

So notice, as soon as John recognizes that someone may sin after coming to faith, and that there’s a method of atonement for that — which is Jesus Christ Himself and His intercession — he also wants to make sure that no one erroneously infers from the possibility of atonement that you're not bound to keep the commandments, that you’re free to break them. No, he says anyone who says he knows Christ but doesn’t keep His commandments is a liar, and the truth isn’t in him. But to those who love God and keep the commandments, the love of God is going to be perfected in them, brought to completion in them, brought to its fullness in them precisely through obedience.

So for John, it’s not like obedience is over here and love is over here. No, no, no. Obedience and love go together. That’s the way we express love for God...is through obedience to His commandments.

Alright, then one last thing about this that is very Jewish (I can’t help it) but very important — is the last line of that verse. It’s not in the lectionary, but I’m going to read it anyway. At the end of verse 5, it says:

By this we may be sure that we are in him: he who says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked. (1 John 2:5b-6)

What does that mean? Well, it doesn’t mean that you have to walk in the same way that Jesus walked literally, that your stride has to match Jesus. It’s a Jewish way of actually referring to the manner of life that you live. So in contemporary Catholic circles, if we talk about keeping the commandments, of vices and virtues, we’ll tend to call that moral theology. It’s about morality. How do we keep the mores of a particular culture or religion? Or we’ll call it ethics. What is the ethos of a particular culture, of a particular religion? And how do we abide by that ethos through the keeping, the practice of ethics?

But in ancient Judaism, they didn’t use either of those terms. They use the term called halakha. So the discussion of how you kept the law was called halakha. And halakha literally comes from the word (the verb) in Hebrew halak, which means to walk. So halakha, how you keep the law, is literally how you walk. It’s a very active image for the fact that in order to keep the commandments, we have to do it everyday. It’s like walking. It’s something that’s a constant process that lasts throughout our lives. So when he says we:

...ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.

It’s an image for the imitation of Christ in our moral life. So although we have an intercessor who atones for our sins, that doesn’t free us from the obligation of imitating the One who was without sin — namely, Jesus Christ.

So on this third Sunday of Easter, I think it’s actually significant that the Church is bringing before us the reminder both of the atoning sacrifice of Jesus that we celebrated at Easter during the Triduum, but also the implications of that sacrifice — namely, that we have to walk in the way that He walked and we have to keep the commandments of God.

So what I mean by that is — during the Easter season you’ll see this — the second readings that are chosen are often teaching us about certain truths of the faith but also about what life in Christ looks like. What does it mean to live in the power of the risen Jesus, to live as members of the Mystical Body of Christ in the new covenant age, in the new era after the Resurrection?

For full access subscribe here >

 

test text
★★★★★ Reviews

Letting Customers Speak for Us

4668 reviews
94%
(4372)
3%
(142)
1%
(58)
0%
(13)
2%
(83)

Dr Pitre is amazing. The way he teaches makes it so easy to understand. He gives me answers to questions I never thought to ask. Without hesitation I will be buying more Bible studies that he has done.

Fantastic

This is a great talk on what Catholics believe about Mary. The book, Jesus and the Jewish Roots of Mary is more detailed. I highly recommend both. As usual, Dr. Pitre does a great job!

The Jewish Roots of Holy Week

I liked “The Jewish Roots of Holy Week :The Seven Last Days of Jesus” very much and appreciate that you divided it into chapters so that I can use it during Lent next year. Your prices are so reasonable too! Thank you!

Absolutely Fabulous

Excellent lecture with terrific information. Always enjoy Dr Bergsma's teaching and style.

Great and fantastic studies!

CP offerings are about as fine as any could be. The material is relevant, cogent, convicting and always brings joy. The CP staff is OUTSTANDING. They know their offerings, listen to your questions/needs/requirements and ensure Customer Service that is Customer Centric. It is a pleasure to have such wonderful studies from a very fine company. God bless you and thank you for what you do.